Research shows COVID-19 vaccines do not affect fertility outcomes

Couples hoping to have a baby through in-vitro fertility treatments, known as IVF, can rest assured that getting a COVID-19 vaccine will not interfere with their fertility outcomes, as a new study has provided critical data that the vaccine has no effect. 

Researchers in New York conducted a study of two separate groups of individuals going through fertility treatments. One group had 222 vaccinated individuals and 983 unvaccinated individuals who underwent ovarian hyperstimulation while the second group of 214 vaccinated individuals and 733 unvaccinated individuals had frozen embryos thawed and transferred to the womb. 

The results of the study found that the first group of individuals undergoing ovarian stimulation had similar rates of eggs retrieved, fertilization and embryos with normal numbers of chromosomes, among several other measures between those who were vaccinated and those who weren’t. 

Those who had frozen embryos thawed and transferred to the womb that were vaccinated had similar rates of pregnancy and pregnancy loss as those who were unvaccinated. 


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“Our findings that vaccination had no impact on these outcomes should be reassuring to those who are trying to conceive or are in early pregnancy,” said Devora A. Aharon, first author of the study and a fellow in reproductive endocrinology and infertility at Icahn Mount Sinai, in a statement. 

All vaccinated patients in the study had received two doses of either the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine or Moderna’s vaccine 14 days or more before their fertility treatments began.  

The new revelation between IVF outcomes and the COVID-19 vaccine comes on the heels of a separate study done by researchers at Boston University that found no difference in fertility if either the male or female partner had been vaccinated when compared to unvaccinated couples 

“By leveraging science and big data, we can help reassure patients of reproductive age and enable them to make the best decisions for themselves. It will give people comfort to know that the COVID-19 vaccine does not affect their reproductive potential,” said Alan B. Copperman, senior author of the study and division director and clinical professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive science at Icahn Mount Sinai. 


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